Volume 7, Issue 1, January 2019, Page: 1-6
Growth Performance, Metabolic Efficiency and Nutrient Utilization of BALB/C Mice Fed with Diet Made from Leftovers from Cocos nucifera Pulp
Omondi Gilbert Ouma, Department of Pure and Applied Sciences, Faculty of Applied and Health Sciences, Technical University of Mombasa, Mombasa, Kenya
Malala Joel Bonface, Department of Pure and Applied Sciences, Faculty of Applied and Health Sciences, Technical University of Mombasa, Mombasa, Kenya; Directorate of Research and Innovation, Mount Kenya University, Thika, Kenya
Msanzu Joseph Baya, Department of Pure and Applied Sciences, Faculty of Applied and Health Sciences, Technical University of Mombasa, Mombasa, Kenya
Anjili Christopher Omukhango, Centre for Biotechnology Research and Development, Kenya Medical Research Institute, Nairobi, Kenya
Gicharu Gibson Kamau, Department of Pure and Applied Sciences, Faculty of Applied and Health Sciences, Technical University of Mombasa, Mombasa, Kenya
Huxley Makonde Mae, Department of Pure and Applied Sciences, Faculty of Applied and Health Sciences, Technical University of Mombasa, Mombasa, Kenya
Chimbevo Lenny Mwagandi, Department of Biomedical Sciences, School of Health Sciences, Kirinyaga University, Kerugoya, Kenya
Received: Jan. 25, 2018;       Accepted: Sep. 5, 2018;       Published: Feb. 27, 2019
DOI: 10.11648/j.ajbio.20190701.11      View  255      Downloads  36
Abstract
Shortage of animal feeds as a result of increased demand and competition for scarcely available animal feeds has led to drastic decrease in animal production globally. In Kenya, utilization of various plant parts including leaves, fruits and bark of various plantations is taking center stage. Coconut palm (Cocos nucifera) a member of the pulp family Arecaceae has potential to feed animals from its leftovers after utilization for human food. The study sought to analyze proximate nutritional value composition of Coconut pulp leftovers and its formulated diet as well as in vivo growth performance of BALB/c mice. Formulated coconut pulp leftovers were dried before both phytochemical analysis and in vivo growth performance was determined. The Proximate analysis indicated Coconut pulp leftovers contained; 3.50±0.22% crude protein, 34.15±2.48% dry matter, 65.85±3.97% moisture content, 10.50±1.2422% total sugars and 25.00±0.35% total fats. Analysis of formulated coconut pulp diet indicated elevated crude protein 14.23±0.52%, dry matter 35.97±0.52% and total sugars 20.47±4.26% while moisture content 64.10±0.50% and total fats 22.10±0.50% declined. In vivo results for the Coconut pulp leftovers application on mice model to ascertain growth performance were as follows; weight gain 0.80±0.50%, SGR 0.33±0.29%, FCR 241.67±556.67% and conditional factor 0.47±0.12%. For formulated diet it was weight gain 3.90±3.22%, SGR 1.0483±0.91%, FCR 28.23±28.92% and conditional factor 0.58±0.04%. The result indicates Coconut pulp leftovers have potential for animal feeds diet formulation.
Keywords
Animal Feeds, Coconut Pulp Leftovers, Formulated Diet, Conditional Factor and Arecaceae
To cite this article
Omondi Gilbert Ouma, Malala Joel Bonface, Msanzu Joseph Baya, Anjili Christopher Omukhango, Gicharu Gibson Kamau, Huxley Makonde Mae, Chimbevo Lenny Mwagandi, Growth Performance, Metabolic Efficiency and Nutrient Utilization of BALB/C Mice Fed with Diet Made from Leftovers from Cocos nucifera Pulp, American Journal of BioScience. Vol. 7, No. 1, 2019, pp. 1-6. doi: 10.11648/j.ajbio.20190701.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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